Skin Check

Skin Check

Skin Check

Did You Know that Skin Cancer Has One of The Highest Prevention Rates? But Only If Diagnosed Early.

At Sydney Skin Cancer Surgery, we provide Full Body Skin Checks as a part of prompt detection of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. At our Clinic you can expect:

  • Total body checks that ensure in-depth assessment and precise diagnosis

  • Examination of every mole and lesion on your skin

  • Accurate diagnosis on any form of skin cancer by our highly trained and accredited specialists

  • After-examination consultation and advice on best therapy approach (if required) and long-term prevention methods

  • Quality treatment tailored to your needs

Regular Skin Check are Essential for Skin Cancer Early Detection

Melanoma
melanoma

Did You Know that Skin Cancer Has One of The Highest Prevention Rates? But Only If Diagnosed Early.

At Sydney Skin Cancer Surgery, we provide Full Body Skin Checks as a part of prompt detection of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. At our Clinic you can expect:

  • Total body checks that ensure in-depth assessment and precise diagnosis

  • Examination of every mole and lesion on your skin

  • Accurate diagnosis on any form of skin cancer by our highly trained and accredited specialists

  • After-examination consultation and advice on best therapy approach (if required) and long-term prevention methods

  • Quality treatment tailored to your needs

Regular Skin Check are Essential for Skin Cancer Early Detection

Melanoma
melanoma
Melanoma
Did You Know that Skin Cancer Has One of The Highest Prevention Rates? But Only If Diagnosed Early.
At Sydney Skin Cancer Surgery, we provide Full Body Skin Checks as a part of prompt detection of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. At our Clinic you can expect:
  • Total body checks that ensure in-depth assessment and precise diagnosis
  • Examination of every mole and lesion on your skin
  • Accurate diagnosis on any form of skin cancer by our highly trained and accredited specialists
  • After-examination consultation and advice on best therapy approach (if required) and long-term prevention methods
  • Quality treatment tailored to your needs
Regular Skin Check are Essential for Skin Cancer Early Detection
melanoma
nodular melanoma

Why Skin Check?

 

• Early detection of cancer is essential to the successful treatment.

• Do you know melanoma?
Melanoma is the most dangerous skin cancer.

• Who could have skin cancer?
• Long term sun exposer
• Fair skin people

• How often should you check your skin?
All adults should check their skin every 3 months, but if you feel any skin suspicious change, you can be checked anytime in our clinic.

Why Skin Check?

• Early detection of cancer is essential to the successful treatment.

• Do you know melanoma?
Melanoma is the most dangerous skin cancer.

• Who could have skin cancer?
• Long term sun exposer
• Fair skin people

• How often should you check your skin?
All adults should check their skin every 3 months, but if you feel any skin suspicious change, you can be checked anytime in our clinic.

Why Skin Check?
• Early detection of cancer is essential to the successful treatment.
 • Do you know melanoma?
Melanoma is the most dangerous skin cancer.
 • Who could have skin cancer?
• Long term sun exposer
• Fair skin people
 • How often should you check your skin?
All adults should check their skin every 3 months, but if you feel any skin suspicious change, you can be checked anytime in our clinic.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON SKIN CANCER

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON SKIN CANCER

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON SKIN CANCER

Should I do a skin check?

Anyone should get their skin checked. Ideally, adults should check their skin every 3 months. If you notice any alarming changes or have never done a skin check we highly recommend you to check your skin in our clinic.

 

We understand that people with any type of skin colour can get skin cancer and therefore advice on early checks, especially if you:

 

  • Spend lots of time exposed to harmful UV radiation of the sun

  • Your family spends lots of time on outdoor activities, while unprotected from sun exposure

  • Have made a self-assessment and noticed some unusual skin changes

  • Have a family history of skin cancer

  • Your skin type (fair skin, freckles) is sensitive to UV radiation

  • You burn easily and have been severely sunburned in the past

  • Use solariums or keep your skin tanned during your lifetime

  • Are over 55 years old male individual

How to Notice The Changes on My Body?

With the process of self-assessment, you will be able to check your entire body from head to toe. Make sure you stand in a room with a good light and check every side, including your head, neck, face, scalp, lips and ears. Conduct the assessment every month. Do not leave out ‘hidden spots’ like your nails or feet.

 

While doing your self-assessment, think of the “ABCD” rule:

 

  • A – Asymmetry – asymmetrical shape where one half mismatches the other

  • B – Border – look for ragged edges

  • C – Colour – any uneven shade of brown, black, red, pink, white or blue

  • D – Diameter – you should be able to notice a significant change in size (more than 6mm)

What Changes Should I Pay Attention to During Self-Assessment?

  • Melanoma – the most dangerous form of skin cancer appears as a bump or pigmented patch. If you have lots of moles on your skin or have noticed new moles overgrowth, you should make an appointment to get your skin checked. The more moles on your skin, the higher risk of melanoma.

  • Basal cell carcinoma – look for small, smooth, pearly bumps or pink or brown coloured lesion.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma – usually appears as a firm, red nodule or a rough flat lesion. They may itch, become crusty or even bleed.

Did you know that -- It Takes Only One Mole to Turn Into a Melanoma?

A simple consultation with our board-certified specialist can save yours and your loved one’s life. You will be required to give your complete clinical history.

 

Our staff conducts a Full Body Scan, taking images of suspicious spots and moles. The images are immediately evaluated for any skin condition.

 

After that, our specialist inspects your entire body followed by confirmation of the diagnosis and early removal if necessary.

Should I do a skin check?

Anyone should get their skin checked. Ideally, adults should check their skin every 3 months. If you notice any alarming changes or have never done a skin check we highly recommend you to check your skin in our clinic.

 

We understand that people with any type of skin colour can get skin cancer and therefore advice on early checks, especially if you:

 

  • Spend lots of time exposed to harmful UV radiation of the sun

  • Your family spends lots of time on outdoor activities, while unprotected from sun exposure

  • Have made a self-assessment and noticed some unusual skin changes

  • Have a family history of skin cancer

  • Your skin type (fair skin, freckles) is sensitive to UV radiation

  • You burn easily and have been severely sunburned in the past

  • Use solariums or keep your skin tanned during your lifetime

  • Are over 55 years old male individual

How to Notice The Changes on My Body?

With the process of self-assessment, you will be able to check your entire body from head to toe. Make sure you stand in a room with a good light and check every side, including your head, neck, face, scalp, lips and ears. Conduct the assessment every month. Do not leave out ‘hidden spots’ like your nails or feet.

 

While doing your self-assessment, think of the “ABCD” rule:

 

  • A – Asymmetry – asymmetrical shape where one half mismatches the other

  • B – Border – look for ragged edges

  • C – Colour – any uneven shade of brown, black, red, pink, white or blue

  • D – Diameter – you should be able to notice a significant change in size (more than 6mm)

What Changes Should I Pay Attention to During Self-Assessment?

  • Melanoma – the most dangerous form of skin cancer appears as a bump or pigmented patch. If you have lots of moles on your skin or have noticed new moles overgrowth, you should make an appointment to get your skin checked. The more moles on your skin, the higher risk of melanoma.

  • Basal cell carcinoma – look for small, smooth, pearly bumps or pink or brown coloured lesion.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma – usually appears as a firm, red nodule or a rough flat lesion. They may itch, become crusty or even bleed.

Did you know that -- It Takes Only One Mole to Turn Into a Melanoma?

A simple consultation with our board-certified specialist can save yours and your loved one’s life. You will be required to give your complete clinical history.

 

Our staff conducts a Full Body Scan, taking images of suspicious spots and moles. The images are immediately evaluated for any skin condition.

 

After that, our specialist inspects your entire body followed by confirmation of the diagnosis and early removal if necessary.

Should I do a skin check?

Anyone should get their skin checked. Ideally, adults should check their skin every 3 months. If you notice any alarming changes or have never done a skin check we highly recommend you to check your skin in our clinic.
 
We understand that people with any type of skin colour can get skin cancer and therefore advice on early checks, especially if you:
 
  • Spend lots of time exposed to harmful UV radiation of the sun
  • Your family spends lots of time on outdoor activities, while unprotected from sun exposure
  • Have made a self-assessment and noticed some unusual skin changes
  • Have a family history of skin cancer
  • Your skin type (fair skin, freckles) is sensitive to UV radiation
  • You burn easily and have been severely sunburned in the past
  • Use solariums or keep your skin tanned during your lifetime
  • Are over 55 years old male individual
How to Notice The Changes on My Body?

With the process of self-assessment, you will be able to check your entire body from head to toe. Make sure you stand in a room with a good light and check every side, including your head, neck, face, scalp, lips and ears. Conduct the assessment every month. Do not leave out ‘hidden spots’ like your nails or feet.
 
While doing your self-assessment, think of the “ABCD” rule:
 
  • A – Asymmetry – asymmetrical shape where one half mismatches the other
  • B – Border – look for ragged edges
  • C – Colour – any uneven shade of brown, black, red, pink, white or blue
  • D – Diameter – you should be able to notice a significant change in size (more than 6mm)
What Changes Should I Pay Attention to During Self-Assessment?

  • Melanoma – the most dangerous form of skin cancer appears as a bump or pigmented patch. If you have lots of moles on your skin or have noticed new moles overgrowth, you should make an appointment to get your skin checked. The more moles on your skin, the higher risk of melanoma.
  • Basal cell carcinoma – look for small, smooth, pearly bumps or pink or brown coloured lesion.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma – usually appears as a firm, red nodule or a rough flat lesion. They may itch, become crusty or even bleed.
Did you know that -- It Takes Only One Mole to Turn Into a Melanoma?

A simple consultation with our board-certified specialist can save yours and your loved one’s life. You will be required to give your complete clinical history.

 

Our staff conducts a Full Body Scan, taking images of suspicious spots and moles. The images are immediately evaluated for any skin condition.

 

After that, our specialist inspects your entire body followed by confirmation of the diagnosis and early removal if necessary.

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Our Services