Research reveals how UV rays activate skin cancer

Scientists discover how ultraviolet rays trigger skin cancer. They may also have found a way to stop skin cancer in its tracks using a gene target.

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin pigment cells, which are called melanocytes. Melanoma only accounts for around 1 percent of all skin cancers, yet it is responsible for most skin cancer-related deaths. Melanomas can occur anywhere on the skin, but they are most likely to develop on the chest and back in men and on the legs in women. Other common sites for melanomas include the neck and face.

When exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, melanocytes release melanin, a dark brown to black pigment that protects the skin from the sun’s rays. But in melanocyte stem cells that have reached and exceeded a threshold of genetic mutations, activation by sun exposure causes them to grow a tumor. Skin cancer research professors have identified a way to prevent melanomas that are caused by the mutated stem cells.

When exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, melanocytes release melanin, a dark brown to black pigment that protects the skin from the sun’s rays. But in melanocyte stem cells that have reached and exceeded a threshold of genetic mutations, activation by sun exposure causes them to grow a tumor.

Scientists have identified a way to prevent melanomas that are caused by the mutated stem cells.

Category : BLOG, Events & Organisations, GP General Service, Skin Check, Skin Surgery
Tags : cancer, melanoma, melanoma cancer, skin cancer, skin cancer checks, skin cancer removal, skin cancer surgery clinic, treatment, UV, UV rays

Skin Check

Skin Check

Skin Check

Skin Check

Did You Know that Skin Cancer Has One of The Highest Prevention Rates? But Only If Diagnosed Early.

At Sydney Skin Cancer Surgery, we provide Full Body Skin Checks as a part of prompt detection of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. At our Clinic you can expect:

  • Total body checks that ensure in-depth assessment and precise diagnosis

  • Examination of every mole and lesion on your skin

  • Accurate diagnosis on any form of skin cancer by our highly trained and accredited specialists

  • After-examination consultation and advice on best therapy approach (if required) and long-term prevention methods

  • Quality treatment tailored to your needs

Regular Skin Check are Essential for Skin Cancer Early Detection

Melanoma
melanoma

Did You Know that Skin Cancer Has One of The Highest Prevention Rates? But Only If Diagnosed Early.

At Sydney Skin Cancer Surgery, we provide Full Body Skin Checks as a part of prompt detection of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. At our Clinic you can expect:

  • Total body checks that ensure in-depth assessment and precise diagnosis

  • Examination of every mole and lesion on your skin

  • Accurate diagnosis on any form of skin cancer by our highly trained and accredited specialists

  • After-examination consultation and advice on best therapy approach (if required) and long-term prevention methods

  • Quality treatment tailored to your needs

Regular Skin Check are Essential for Skin Cancer Early Detection

Melanoma
melanoma
Melanoma
Did You Know that Skin Cancer Has One of The Highest Prevention Rates? But Only If Diagnosed Early.
At Sydney Skin Cancer Surgery, we provide Full Body Skin Checks as a part of prompt detection of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. At our Clinic you can expect:
  • Total body checks that ensure in-depth assessment and precise diagnosis
  • Examination of every mole and lesion on your skin
  • Accurate diagnosis on any form of skin cancer by our highly trained and accredited specialists
  • After-examination consultation and advice on best therapy approach (if required) and long-term prevention methods
  • Quality treatment tailored to your needs
Regular Skin Check are Essential for Skin Cancer Early Detection
melanoma
nodular melanoma

Why Skin Check?

 

• Early detection of cancer is essential to the successful treatment.

• Do you know melanoma?
Melanoma is the most dangerous skin cancer.

• Who could have skin cancer?
• Long term sun exposer
• Fair skin people

• How often should you check your skin?
All adults should check their skin every 3 months, but if you feel any skin suspicious change, you can be checked anytime in our clinic.

Why Skin Check?

• Early detection of cancer is essential to the successful treatment.

• Do you know melanoma?
Melanoma is the most dangerous skin cancer.

• Who could have skin cancer?
• Long term sun exposer
• Fair skin people

• How often should you check your skin?
All adults should check their skin every 3 months, but if you feel any skin suspicious change, you can be checked anytime in our clinic.

Why Skin Check?
• Early detection of cancer is essential to the successful treatment.
 • Do you know melanoma?
Melanoma is the most dangerous skin cancer.
 • Who could have skin cancer?
• Long term sun exposer
• Fair skin people
 • How often should you check your skin?
All adults should check their skin every 3 months, but if you feel any skin suspicious change, you can be checked anytime in our clinic.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON SKIN CANCER

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON SKIN CANCER

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON SKIN CANCER

Should I do a skin check?

Anyone should get their skin checked. Ideally, adults should check their skin every 3 months. If you notice any alarming changes or have never done a skin check we highly recommend you to check your skin in our clinic.

 

We understand that people with any type of skin colour can get skin cancer and therefore advice on early checks, especially if you:

 

  • Spend lots of time exposed to harmful UV radiation of the sun

  • Your family spends lots of time on outdoor activities, while unprotected from sun exposure

  • Have made a self-assessment and noticed some unusual skin changes

  • Have a family history of skin cancer

  • Your skin type (fair skin, freckles) is sensitive to UV radiation

  • You burn easily and have been severely sunburned in the past

  • Use solariums or keep your skin tanned during your lifetime

  • Are over 55 years old male individual

How to Notice The Changes on My Body?

With the process of self-assessment, you will be able to check your entire body from head to toe. Make sure you stand in a room with a good light and check every side, including your head, neck, face, scalp, lips and ears. Conduct the assessment every month. Do not leave out ‘hidden spots’ like your nails or feet.

 

While doing your self-assessment, think of the “ABCD” rule:

 

  • A – Asymmetry – asymmetrical shape where one half mismatches the other

  • B – Border – look for ragged edges

  • C – Colour – any uneven shade of brown, black, red, pink, white or blue

  • D – Diameter – you should be able to notice a significant change in size (more than 6mm)

What Changes Should I Pay Attention to During Self-Assessment?

  • Melanoma – the most dangerous form of skin cancer appears as a bump or pigmented patch. If you have lots of moles on your skin or have noticed new moles overgrowth, you should make an appointment to get your skin checked. The more moles on your skin, the higher risk of melanoma.

  • Basal cell carcinoma – look for small, smooth, pearly bumps or pink or brown coloured lesion.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma – usually appears as a firm, red nodule or a rough flat lesion. They may itch, become crusty or even bleed.

Did you know that -- It Takes Only One Mole to Turn Into a Melanoma?

A simple consultation with our board-certified specialist can save yours and your loved one’s life. You will be required to give your complete clinical history.

 

Our staff conducts a Full Body Scan, taking images of suspicious spots and moles. The images are immediately evaluated for any skin condition.

 

After that, our specialist inspects your entire body followed by confirmation of the diagnosis and early removal if necessary.

Should I do a skin check?

Anyone should get their skin checked. Ideally, adults should check their skin every 3 months. If you notice any alarming changes or have never done a skin check we highly recommend you to check your skin in our clinic.

 

We understand that people with any type of skin colour can get skin cancer and therefore advice on early checks, especially if you:

 

  • Spend lots of time exposed to harmful UV radiation of the sun

  • Your family spends lots of time on outdoor activities, while unprotected from sun exposure

  • Have made a self-assessment and noticed some unusual skin changes

  • Have a family history of skin cancer

  • Your skin type (fair skin, freckles) is sensitive to UV radiation

  • You burn easily and have been severely sunburned in the past

  • Use solariums or keep your skin tanned during your lifetime

  • Are over 55 years old male individual

How to Notice The Changes on My Body?

With the process of self-assessment, you will be able to check your entire body from head to toe. Make sure you stand in a room with a good light and check every side, including your head, neck, face, scalp, lips and ears. Conduct the assessment every month. Do not leave out ‘hidden spots’ like your nails or feet.

 

While doing your self-assessment, think of the “ABCD” rule:

 

  • A – Asymmetry – asymmetrical shape where one half mismatches the other

  • B – Border – look for ragged edges

  • C – Colour – any uneven shade of brown, black, red, pink, white or blue

  • D – Diameter – you should be able to notice a significant change in size (more than 6mm)

What Changes Should I Pay Attention to During Self-Assessment?

  • Melanoma – the most dangerous form of skin cancer appears as a bump or pigmented patch. If you have lots of moles on your skin or have noticed new moles overgrowth, you should make an appointment to get your skin checked. The more moles on your skin, the higher risk of melanoma.

  • Basal cell carcinoma – look for small, smooth, pearly bumps or pink or brown coloured lesion.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma – usually appears as a firm, red nodule or a rough flat lesion. They may itch, become crusty or even bleed.

Did you know that -- It Takes Only One Mole to Turn Into a Melanoma?

A simple consultation with our board-certified specialist can save yours and your loved one’s life. You will be required to give your complete clinical history.

 

Our staff conducts a Full Body Scan, taking images of suspicious spots and moles. The images are immediately evaluated for any skin condition.

 

After that, our specialist inspects your entire body followed by confirmation of the diagnosis and early removal if necessary.

Should I do a skin check?

Anyone should get their skin checked. Ideally, adults should check their skin every 3 months. If you notice any alarming changes or have never done a skin check we highly recommend you to check your skin in our clinic.
 
We understand that people with any type of skin colour can get skin cancer and therefore advice on early checks, especially if you:
 
  • Spend lots of time exposed to harmful UV radiation of the sun
  • Your family spends lots of time on outdoor activities, while unprotected from sun exposure
  • Have made a self-assessment and noticed some unusual skin changes
  • Have a family history of skin cancer
  • Your skin type (fair skin, freckles) is sensitive to UV radiation
  • You burn easily and have been severely sunburned in the past
  • Use solariums or keep your skin tanned during your lifetime
  • Are over 55 years old male individual
How to Notice The Changes on My Body?

With the process of self-assessment, you will be able to check your entire body from head to toe. Make sure you stand in a room with a good light and check every side, including your head, neck, face, scalp, lips and ears. Conduct the assessment every month. Do not leave out ‘hidden spots’ like your nails or feet.
 
While doing your self-assessment, think of the “ABCD” rule:
 
  • A – Asymmetry – asymmetrical shape where one half mismatches the other
  • B – Border – look for ragged edges
  • C – Colour – any uneven shade of brown, black, red, pink, white or blue
  • D – Diameter – you should be able to notice a significant change in size (more than 6mm)
What Changes Should I Pay Attention to During Self-Assessment?

  • Melanoma – the most dangerous form of skin cancer appears as a bump or pigmented patch. If you have lots of moles on your skin or have noticed new moles overgrowth, you should make an appointment to get your skin checked. The more moles on your skin, the higher risk of melanoma.
  • Basal cell carcinoma – look for small, smooth, pearly bumps or pink or brown coloured lesion.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma – usually appears as a firm, red nodule or a rough flat lesion. They may itch, become crusty or even bleed.
Did you know that -- It Takes Only One Mole to Turn Into a Melanoma?

A simple consultation with our board-certified specialist can save yours and your loved one’s life. You will be required to give your complete clinical history.

 

Our staff conducts a Full Body Scan, taking images of suspicious spots and moles. The images are immediately evaluated for any skin condition.

 

After that, our specialist inspects your entire body followed by confirmation of the diagnosis and early removal if necessary.

Our Services

Our Services

Our Services

MWS Skin Cancer Update 2017 – Cape Town March 3rd–4th, 2017

View PDF Document

The Melanoma World Society (MWS) is the successor organization to the WHO Melanoma Group. The latter established the World Congress of Melanoma in the years 1985–2005, conducted trials and other projects with melanoma patients. The WHO melanoma group was disbanded in 2005, as WHO did no longer financially support such expert groups. MWS was initiated at the 8th World Congress of Melanoma 2013 in Hamburg, founded in June 2014 in Munich, and registered in January 2016.

The First MWS International Educational Symposium – Skin Cancer Update 2017 is the first of a series of educational meetings organized under the auspices of the Melanoma World Society. It is intended to organize the meeting every year in different countries.

International and national key opinion leaders on skin cancer will be invited to give an overview throughout specified presentations, to present latest clinical trial results, and to discuss on exciting new drugs, technologies and methods of treatment with the audience. The lively interaction of clinicians, as well as experts in translational and basic research, and representatives of the pharmaceutical industry, guarantees a successful outcome for every participant.

In addition to the scientific value of this meeting, every participant may seize the given opportunity to interact with experts in a familiar setting in one of the most interesting cities of South Africa.

Please join us for this event and submit your own studies and case presentations as free communications and as posters.

We look forward to welcoming you in Cape Town in March 2017!

 
 
Category : BLOG, Events & Organisations, Skin Check, Skin Surgery
Tags : cancer, melanoma, melanoma group, melanoma world society, mws, skin, skin cancer, skin cancer checks, skin cancer removal, skin cancer surgery clinic, surgery clinic, treatment

HALLMARKS OF SKIN CANCER (HoSC) CONFERENCE

HALLMARKS OF SKIN CANCER (HoSC) CONFERENCE

November 6th-8th, 2017, HEIDELBERG

 

HoSC is organised by PhD and MD students of the Research Training Group (RTG) 2099 Hallmarks of Skin Cancer, headed by Prof.Sergij Goerdt. The RTG profits from a lively exchange between its research centres in London, Mannheim and Heidelberg combining basic science and clinical education with the emphasis on the hallmarks of skin cancer.

Our aim is to improve the understanding of skin cancer biology by addressing the key questions regarding tumour initiation, progression and metastasis. Additionally, we focus on the questions surrounding the contribution of angiogenesis, immune response and stroma in tumourigenesis.

This conference will offer a platform for young scientists and students where they can meet outstanding experts in the field and establish contacts with fellow researchers from all over the world.

 

The conference will take place from 6th-8th November 2017 at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg.

We are looking forward to lectures from the following confirmed distinguished speakers:

Boris C. Bastian, San Francisco

Corine Bertolotto, Nice

Cédric Blanpain, Bruxelles

Anja Katrin Bosserhoff, Erlangen

Meenhard Herlyn, Philadelphia

Catherin Niemann, Cologne

Carien Niessen, Cologne

Sergio Quezada, London

Dennis Roop, Aurora

Dirk Schadendorf, Essen

Maria Sibilia, Vienna

Patrizia Stoitzner, Innsbruck

Thomas Tüting, Magdeburg

Erwin Wagner, Madrid

Fiona M. Watt, London

Ashani Weeraratna, Philadelphia

 

For detailed information on the programme, please refer to the preliminary schedule.

Category : BLOG, Events & Organisations, Skin Check, Skin Surgery
Tags : 2017, cancer, conference, event, hallmark, hosc, organization, seminar, skin, skin cancer